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FAQs

Why use an NICEIC approved installer?

There are approximately 2,000 electric shock accidents and 12,500 electrical fires in homes across the UK each year. Although many incidents are caused by faulty appliances rather than the electrical installation itself, a properly installed and well-maintained installation could save lives. Enrollment with the NICEIC is voluntary, but members are assessed regularly to ensure that work is carried out the highest standards, safe installations being their number one priority.

What are your normal operating hours?

Monday – Thursday 8.30 am to 5.30 pm

Thursday – Friday 8.30 am to 5.00 pm

Occasional weekends

Upon request it may be possible to carry out work outside these times.

How much do you charge?

Each job we undertake is priced individually, however we believe that we offer competitive quotes and as we are NICEIC approved also offer a warranty on all work undertaken.

We also offer a discount to pensioners - please ask at the time of quotation. All quotations are offered free of charge on a no obligation basis.

Glossary of Electrical Terms

BS - British Standard
British Standard BS 7671 – also known as the IEE (Institute of Electrical Engineering) wiring regulations, details the requirements for electrical installations and is the standard against which all NICEIC contractors are assessed.

Circuit
An assembly of electrical equipment (socket outlets, lighting points and switches) supplied from the same origin and protected against over current by the same protective device(s).

Circuit-breaker or RCD
A device capable of making, carrying and breaking normal load currents and also making and automatically breaking, under pre-determined conditions, abnormal currents such as short-circuit currents.

Consumer unit
Also known as a fusebox, consumer control unit or electricity control unit, a particular type of distribution board comprising a co-ordinated assembly for the control and distribution of electrical energy, principally in domestic premises, incorporating manual means of double-pole isolation on the incoming circuit(s) and an assembly of one or more fuses, circuit-breakers, residual current operated devices or signalling and other devices purposely manufactured for such use.

Distribution board
An assembly containing switching or protective devices (e.g. fuses, circuit-breakers, residual current operated devices) associated with one or more outgoing circuits fed from one or more incoming circuits, together with terminals for the neutral and protective circuit conductors. It may also include signalling and other control devices. Means of isolation may be included in the board or may be provided separately.

Electrical installation
Any assembly of electrical equipment supplied by a common source to fulfil a specific purpose.

LV
Low Voltage

Overcurrent
Electrical current (in amps) that exceeds the maximum limit of a circuit. May result in risk of fire or shock from insulation damaged from heat generated by overcurrent condition.

Part P
The specific section of the Building Regulations for England and Wales that relates to electrical installations in domestic properties. Part P provides safety regulations to protect householders, and requires most domestic electrical work to be carried out by government-registered electricians, or to be inspected by Building Control officers.

PAT - Portable Appliance Testing
Inspection and testing of electrical equipment including portable appliances, moveable equipment, hand held appliances, stationary equipment, fixed equipment/appliances, IT equipment and extension leads.

PIR - Periodic Inspection Report
An electrical survey, known as a Periodic Inspection Report (PIR) will reveal if electrical circuits are overloaded, find potential hazards in the installation, identify defective DIY work, highlight any lack of earthing or bonding and carry out tests on the fixed wiring of the installation. The cost of a typical PIR should start around £100, depending on the size of your property. The report will establish the overall condition of all the electrics and state whether it is satisfactory for continued use, and should detail any work that might need to be done.

RCD - Residual current device
Residual current device is a safety device that switches off the electricity automatically when it detects an earth fault, providing protection against electric shock.

Ring final circuit/ring main/ring
A final circuit connected in the form of a ring and connected to a single point of supply.

SELV
Separated Extra-Low Voltage. An extra-low voltage system, which is electrically separated from Earth and from other systems in such a way that a single fault cannot give rise to the risk of electric shock.

Voltage, extra-low
Normally not exceeding 50 V a.c. or 120 V ripple-free d.c., whether between conductors or to earth.